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White Papers

Kuder’s research faculty and other knowledgeable contributors provide white papers to discuss industry trends, share positions on career guidance topics, and educate readers on important, global issues in the field. 

To read a paper in full, click on the title or read more button to download the PDF.

Overview of Career Guidance: ItsOverview of Career Guidance Foundations, Objectives, and Methodology

May 2016

This paper provides an overview of the foundations, standards, and objectives of career guidance, describes career interventions and settings, while listing tools, resources, and delivery modes.

Because career development is sequential and lifelong, its objectives are different at different life stages. Clear, measurable objectives at each grade level or age range are essential because these become the bedrock for content development and evaluation of the programs and services offered at each age or grade level. The career education movement has tended to divide career guidance services into periods of career awareness (K-grade 5), career exploration (grades 6-8), and career preparation and planning (grades 9-16). Of course, the process does not end there, but continues across the life span as individuals need to develop new skills and change both occupations and jobs due to personal choices and economic demands

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Career Development Needs of Students in aCareer Development Needs
Developing Country in Africa

October 2015

This white paper shares insights from the Kuder® Career Needs Assessment™, which was administered to the following stakeholder groups in a developing country in Africa: secondary school students, parents, teachers, school administrators, and community partners.

In June of 2014, personnel from Kuder, Inc. (and its wholly owned subsidiary, Kuder Visions Unlimited, LLC) administered the Kuder® Career Needs Assessment™ to four groups of stakeholders in a developing country in Africa. The purposes of the needs assessments were twofold: (1) to build a career planning system that directly addresses students’ educational and career development needs, and (2) to serve as baseline data for evaluating the effectiveness of the career planning system. Needs assessments were administered to secondary school students, their parents, their teachers and school administrators, and community partners (local leaders, employers, etc.). 

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Career Guidance and Its Implementation in the United StatesCareer Guidance & Its Implementation in the United States

September 2014

This white paper summarizes the rationale, structure and content, modes of delivery, types of service providers, and major theoretical model for career guidance in the United States.

The rationale for providing career guidance services is built on two foundations: a) the desire for individuals to have satisfying work, or in a more lofty statement, to implement their self-concepts through work; and b) the need for nations to have a sufficient number of trained, skilled individuals to fill the positions that employers have to offer and produce the gross national product that a healthy economy needs. Sometimes these goals are at odds with each other because there are not sufficient jobs to match the interests of all individuals, and a country may need more workers in specific fields than there are individuals who want to work in those fields or are trained to do so. This pull results in the compromise that many need to make in a career choice.

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EvidenceEvidence for Career Guidance Cost-Effectiveness

August 2014

This white paper reviews the criteria, methodologies, and challenges related to assessing the cost-effectiveness of career guidance programs at local, regional, and national levels.

Though several countries (such as the United Kingdom, the United States, and Canada) have conceptualized evidence-based models to guide the collection of data about the benefits of career guidance, including return on investment, it is difficult to find a model that has been fully implemented in practice. This fact appears to be true due both to the complexity of the task and to the lack of funds to fully implement it. Nonetheless, these models serve as useful overviews of what can be assessed, and for that reason they are described here. 

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Value of Career EducationThe Value of Career Education: A Brief Summary

August 2009

This white paper seeks to answer the following questions:  (1) What are the critical components of effective career interventions? (2) What are the benefits of computer-based career guidance systems? (3) Why is career development necessary throughout the life span? (4) What are the practical implications of using such career systems?

Vocational psychology has a rich tradition of theory development and critical, empirical evaluation of the career development process across the life span (Brown & Lent, 2005). Many years of research and multiple meta-analytic studies have found that career interventions positively impact the vocational development of students and clients (Brown & Ryan-Krane, 2000; Oliver and Spokane, 1988; Swanson, 1995; Whiston, Sexton, & Lasoff, 1998).

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Career Assessment and PlanningCareer Assessment & Planning: A Collaborative Solution for Preparing America’s Workforce

March 2009

This white paper discusses the major dilemma in the United States in developing a highly trained workforce that keeps pace with today’s fastest growing jobs and presents Kuder research faculty’s solution.

Since the 1930s when Dr. Frederick Kuder developed one of the first career interest inventory surveys, Kuder, Inc. has been at the forefront of career planning and workforce preparation. Today, more than 100 million people in the United States, Europe, and Asia have used Kuder assessment and career planning solutions to make and prepare for satisfying career choices. America is at a crossroads in terms of workforce development and global competition. This workforce crisis requires a new and more coordinated approach that can assist the unemployed, underemployed, and hard-to-reach populations who are not encouraged to engage in a formal career planning process. 

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